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How Belarus enriches post-Soviet heritage

TV presenter Egor Khrustalev discussed the present of Belarus with the Russian political scientist and publicist Elena Ponomareva.

Egor Khrustalev:
Elena, once I watched the talk-show where the question “Do you like independent Belarus?” was discussed. And you were one of those few who stood up for this country. What do people of your professional circle think about this topic? And what are the main discussion subjects of the Belarusian-Russian relations and Belarus itself?

Elena Ponomareva:
The latest situation around Belarus and the raise of the Belarusian question trigger concern. Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko is right when he says that Russia and Belarus is our common motherland. And the actions taken by Russian mass media, political quarters and economic authorities are the result of, so to say, behind-the-scene struggle for resources.

Nowadays we are in the era of political and economic fights for resources and dominance over territories.

The amount of resources per population and per transnational associations is decreasing. Belarus is the only country that managed not only to retain the Soviet heritage in industry, science, culture, and infrastructure, but also to enrich it. And now Belarus implements the successful economic model represented by modernized factories.

Egor Khrustalev:
However, we are debating about this model. It seems to be not that successful. Many opponents argue that there is no state in the world which could function properly with such a huge share of public property. 

Elena Ponomareva:
Well, yet there is. Belarus does it pretty good. If we compare all former Soviet Union republics, we will see that Belarus is the most successful example. Take a look at Ukraine. It was the second country in terms of economic, demographic and resource potential just after the USSR’s dissolution. And what has it become now?

This happened because of oligarchical groups which cared only about their own welfare, and forgot about their people.

In Belarus, the government managed to keep and to increase the potential. For this reason, certain Russian groups want to privatize some economically profitable Belarusian sectors.

How Belarus enriches post-Soviet heritage