What is October Revolution Day in the 21st century?

What is October Revolution Day in the 21st century?

Belarus marked October Revolution Day November 7. The older generation usually say Great October Socialist Revolution. New Belarusians heard much about other kinds of revolutions - "color" or "velvet". But then, in spite of the soft prefixes the word "revolution" cannot be pleasant for reasonable people. Probably, apart from the meaning "scientific and technical revolution".

Several hundred people gathered near the monument to Vladimir Lenin on November 7. These are both people who personally saw how the Day of the Great October Revolution was celebrated in the Soviet Union, and those who are yet to learn about the events of 1917 from school textbooks. Traditional cloves were laid at the monument.

Today students in Belarusian schools can discuss freely the events that happened about 100 years ago. In the Soviet times, however, no discussions of this topic were allowed since only one point of view was considered right.

But not all young people now know about what this day means.

Belarusians:
What do I know about November 7? This is a day in the calendar. There was a revolution.

November 7 was our main holiday some time ago.

A red letter day. That's it. What is this day timed to? Sorry, I do not know.

A red letter day and a day off. Generally, it is October Revolution Day, if I'm not mistaken.

Previously, there was a feast, and now a day off.

The majority of older Belarusians of course know about the essence of this day. But did this revolution bring historical dividends to our country? Facts are controversial for some people but our experts have no doubt.

Sergei Tretyak, head of the Institute of History of the National Academy of Sciences:
For Belarus, the Great October Revolution opened the way for almost a national state. Whether some like it or not. It was after the Declaration of the Rights and the Peoples of Russia when it became possible to talk about the right of Belarusians to establish their national state.

Reminders about the October Revolution are all over Belarus. We are talking about monuments to Lenin. Many interesting stories are associated with some of these monuments.

For example, the Lenin in Independence Square in Minsk was rebuilt from scratch after the German occupation.

This man, Nikolay, has a good collection of Lenin monuments in his garage.

Nikolay Yurchenko:
This one is from the House of Culture, and this one also from the Culture House, from the village Novoselki. Six men were loading it into the car.

He does not call himself a collector, but dozens of Lenins are in his garage.

Nikolay Yurchenko:
This is the bust of Lenin that was standing in the district committee of the (Communist) party. He wandered from office to office, until I found him a place here. I cannot say he feels better here but at least he will live here, not thrown away.

Local communists lend Nikolay's gypsum leader for thematic holidays. The owner himself hopes that once he will be able to open a small museum of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin and one again underline the various opinions about the October Revolution in Belarusian history.

Nikolay Yurchenko:
I want our children to know and respect this period in our history. There were positive and negative moments. You just cannot isolate one thing from another and form only one-sided opinion.

This girl's name is already history.

Vilora Gorbach:
My name is Vilora.

She was a little shocked when she found out that the once popular name Vilora is an acronym for "Vladimir Ilyich Lenin - the Organizer of the Revolution."

It was a decision of her father to name the girl this way. Vilora is very pleased to have such an exotic name!

Vilora Gorbach:
Some think that this is a nickname. And ask my real name.

Vilora does not plan to celebrate November 7 but this man, Stepan Rogov, has birthday today. He is of the same age as the revolution. Moreover, he was born in 1917, exactly on October 25 (7 November, according to the new calendar) - the day the Revolution took place.

Stepan Rogov:
Why unpleasant? It was nice that the event and the birthday coincide. I have been celebrating my birthday each November 7. Demonstrations took place, then we got together for a drink. Sure thing.

Today Belarus does not have those noisy Communist demonstrations with slogans on red cloth but memory of these events still lives in monuments and street names all over Belarus.